Listed as a Grade 1 building on 15th April 1965, the hotel is one of approximately 500 listed buildings in Ludlow, but is certainly one of its best known.

The History of The Feathers Hotel Ludlow

You would be hard pressed to find as much character and history in a UK hotel.

The Feathers Hotel dates back to 1619 and was completed that year by Rees Jones, a practicing attorney from Pembrokeshire who had come to Ludlow to pursue his profession at the “Council of the Marches”.

Listed as a Grade 1 building on 15th April 1965, the hotel is one of approximately 500 listed buildings in Ludlow, but is certainly one of its best known.  Converted to an inn in 1670, the imposing half-timbered Feathers Hotel is noted for its Jacobean furnishings and its timber façade which features motifs of the Prince of Wales’ feathers, from where the name derives.

From quirky touches to its interior, ornate ceilings and stunning top to floor woodwork that has to be seen to be believed. The studded plank front door is the original as well as bays that are moulded with curved mullions and transoms with cast diamond glazing; all adding to the charm which welcomes new guests and draws loyal guests back time and time again.

It was the renowned Robert Pancheri, famous for his wooden architectural sculptures and carvings for churches and public buildings, who was responsible for the restoration of wooden carvings here at The Feathers Hotel, for which he won the Civic Trust Award in 1970 and was no doubt why the New York Times reportedly named it ‘The Most Handsome Inn in the world!’